Imagine a Landing on Pluto

Explanation: Made from more than 100 New Horizons images taken over six weeks of approach and close flyby, this video offers a trip in to Pluto — starting with a distant spacecraft's-eye view of Pluto and its largest moon, Charon, to an eventual ride in for a "landing" on the shoreline of Pluto's informally named Sputnik Planum. The video shows what it would be like to ride aboard an approaching spacecraft and see Pluto grow from a "dot" to become a world, and then to swoop down over Pluto's spectacular terrains. Pluto picture of the day is coming to an end, but New Horizons is not finished. Visit pluto.jhuapl.edu and nasa.gov/newhorizons for more information on the mission!

Pluto

Where is New Horizons now? (July 2016)

Explanation: Pluto picture of the day may be winding down, but New Horizons still travels on. One year after the Pluto flyby, this image shows New Horizons' current position along its full planned trajectory. The green segment of the line shows where New Horizons has traveled since launch; the red indicates the spacecraft's future path. Positions of stars with magnitude 12 or brighter are shown from this perspective, which is slightly above the orbital plane of the planets. New Horizons will reach 2014 MU69 on January 1, 2019

Pluto